Hello!

Welcome to my blog, fellow alpha gun girl! I hope my articles help you stay informed on the range and at home. Have a nice stay!

Dry Fire: The Importance of Home Practice

Dry Fire: The Importance of Home Practice

Ladies, if you want to step up your shooting game it’s time to commit to some dry fire practice.  Dry fire is the practice of manipulating and firing your gun with NO LIVE AMMO. This type of practice can be extremely beneficial in helping you become a better shooter while increasing your overall confidence behind the gun.  Here are a few tips to keep in mind when you’re dry firing at home:

1. Perfect practice makes perfect NOT practice makes perfect

There is definitely such a thing as bad practice, so when you start dry firing be sure to set small manageable goals for yourself.  These goals should reflect your current shooting level.  For a new shooter your goal might be to work on getting the correct grip, seeing a good sight picture, and having a deliberate trigger pull –- this is a great start!  For the shooter that is just starting to participate in competitive shooting or any shooting from the holster, a great starting place would be working to draw the gun correctly. Consider your current experience level and get an idea of where you’d like to go, then set your dry fire goals accordingly.

 

2. Practice with the gun you will be using most frequently

If you are a new shooter stick to practicing with one gun, at least in the beginning.  Once you've gotten fairly good at manipulating this gun you will find that learning a new gun will be a little easier the next time around.  Dry fire still applies to those of you who just own a weapon for carry or home defense. In fact this is probably the most important gun to be familiar with considering if you should ever need it, it will be to protect your life.  Let's hope you know what you're working with! For the competitive shooter, you will ideally be using the gun you use to compete.  If your competition gun and personal defense gun are different be sure to make time to learn both

3. Practice realistic scenarios

 

This tip assumes that you have already gotten plenty of practice with your correct grip, proper sight picture, and deliberate trigger pull. Never skip these crucial fundamentals, I promise they will haunt you! Assuming you’ve done this, now you should be practicing realistic scenarios within what is possible inside your home. If you own a firearm strictly for personal or home protection this means practicing and/or grabbing your gun from its storing place.  This might be a holster on your person, a purse holster, your nightstand and so on. For the competition shooter who shoots IDPA this might mean shooting from behind cover or practicing reloads with retention.  For the USPSA competitor you could work on fast target transitions or mag changes. Most of these scenarios are going to vary depending on the purpose of your training and your overall goals as a shooter, use your imagination!

 

Now that you have some good tips it’s time to make a plan to practice.  Your dry fire sessions need to be no longer than about 15 minutes.  In a perfect world you’d practice every day but sometimes life gets in the way and that’s just not possible.  At minimum a few times a week is a good goal.  I’d suggest writing yourself a list of things you want to work on and determine which days of the week you can commit to. Reach out to more experience people and get some guidance, be sure the person giving you advice knows what they’re talking about.  For questions or advice click here to contact me.

PS. You don’t really need anything extra to have a good dry fire practice, a little cardboard and imagination go a long way. However, they are things available online for purchase like snap caps (dummy rounds) or pre made dry fire targets.

First Match Blues: What I Wished I Knew

First Match Blues: What I Wished I Knew

3 Gear Items You'll Need For Your First Match

3 Gear Items You'll Need For Your First Match

0